Something to think about

Despite the benefits of keeping bees, past studies have shown that honeybees, which are not native to the United States, can have negative effects on the environment. They compete with native bees, spread diseases and pollinate plants less efficiently. Now, new research from scientists at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) suggests honeybee pollination may also lead to… Continue reading Something to think about

Mosquitoes and possums may spread a flesh-eating disease in Australia

Some mosquitoes buzzing around parts of Australia could be ferrying dangerous cargo from possums to people: flesh-eating bacteria. Of 13 mosquitoes from that species that had recently fed on an animal, two had sucked blood from both a ringtail possum and a person. That’s a small number, but such mosquitoes are probably rare, given that… Continue reading Mosquitoes and possums may spread a flesh-eating disease in Australia

El Niño and Malaria in Ethiopia

Malaria–climate relationships in Ethiopia are complex, unravelling them requires good climate and malaria data (as well as data on potential confounders) and an understanding of the regional and local climate system. The development of climate informed early warning systems must, therefore, target a specific region and season when predictability is high and where the climate… Continue reading El Niño and Malaria in Ethiopia

Vector-borne diseases risk increasing in Europe

European scientists say more frequent heatwaves and flooding, and longer, warmer summers, have created more favorable conditions for the bugs. They are calling for better measures to control and protect against mosquitoes. The European CDC report suggests this year, the Aedes albopictus mosquito (known to carry dengue and chikungunya) “established” itself in 13 countries in… Continue reading Vector-borne diseases risk increasing in Europe

Malaria is not new to the United States

People tend to think of malaria as a tropical disease, says Christopher Vitek, a medical entomologist at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley in Edinburg. “But the fact of the matter is, historically we’ve had a fair amount of malaria transmission here in the U.S.” And the risk of transmission now is not zero.… Continue reading Malaria is not new to the United States

LE MOUSTIQUE TIGRE CAPABLE DE TRANSMETTRE LE VIRUS DU CHIKUNGUNYA À DES TEMPÉRATURES TEMPÉRÉES

Les émergences récentes de maladies à transmission vectorielle ont marqué un tournant en matière de santé publique, ces maladies affectant des territoires de plus en plus éloignés des zones endémiques. Cette situation tire son origine des changements environnementaux et de l’intensification des échanges commerciaux ou de voyageurs entre les continents. Le virus du chikungunya a été signalé… Continue reading LE MOUSTIQUE TIGRE CAPABLE DE TRANSMETTRE LE VIRUS DU CHIKUNGUNYA À DES TEMPÉRATURES TEMPÉRÉES

Dengue Outbreak in Peru

According to official reports, the death toll from the outbreak has risen to 248 as of June 16, while reported cases have surpassed 146,000. The situation caused the minister of health to step down. It is unfortunate that Dengue has returned to a region that had it under control for years. The full report is… Continue reading Dengue Outbreak in Peru

Three new malaria cases in the US. The first in two decades.

Although about 2,000 people infected with malaria turn up in the US health care system every year, those cases are all linked to travel outside the US. Neither those involved in the Florida cases nor the Texas case had traveled. That means in both states, the infection was acquired within US borders. There is no reason to… Continue reading Three new malaria cases in the US. The first in two decades.

What attracts mosquitoes?

Studying what mosquitoes are attracted to “gives us some really good clues about what mosquitoes are using to hunt us, and understanding what that is, is essential for us to come up with the next steps.” Details in the link below. https://edition.cnn.com/2023/05/19/world/mosquito-human-body-odor-malaria-scn/index.html

Malaria vectors are moving

Malaria vectors have spread southward expansion by 4.7 kilometers (nearly 3 miles) every year, and risen 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) in elevation each year. That’s further and faster than previous estimates which reported that across the board, terrestrial species were moving poleward by 1.7 kilometers (1.05 miles) a year and upslope by 1.1 meters (3.6 feet)… Continue reading Malaria vectors are moving